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Our mission is to reduce the impact of invasive plant species in the Midwest

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Early Detection and Rapid Response (EDRR)

MIPN Resources:

AQUATIC INVASIVE PLANTS in the Midwest flyer - Download

To report sightings of plants described in the flyer:

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INVASIVE PLANTS in the Midwest flyer (PDF) (High resolution copy) - Download

  • Click here for a lower resolution copy (faster download time)
  • For those needing large quantities of the flyer for distribution, click here.
  • One of the plants on the flyer, Giant hogweed, is frequently mis-identified as cow parsnip. For more information and identification tips for Giant hogweed, click here.

Form to report sightings of plants described by the New INVASIVE PLANTS in the Midwest flyer.

Fact sheets about each plant listed on the New INVASIVE PLANTS in the Midwest flyer.

Click on the name to download the PDF.

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Other Resources:

Interactive Weed Identification Database - created by Mark Renz, University of Wisconsin, the database contains 280 of the most common weeds/invasive plants found in agricultural, urban, and natural settings in Wisconsin.  At the website, click on the Weed ID Tool in the left column. The database is organized to ask questions about the unknown plant, and, based on the user’s input, the website will produce a list of plants (scientific and common names) along with thumbnail images that match the information entered.

Interface for the Global Invasive Species Database (GISD) - free, authoritative information about introduced species that threaten native biodiversity.

EDRR Website - developed by the North American Weed Management Association

Ohio DNR - DNAP Forest Invasive Poster PDF) - For more information, visit www.ohiodnr.com

New Invaders Watch List: Early Detection and Rapid Response Network, for NE Illinois and adjacent Wisconsin and Indiana counties.

Wisconsin Invasive Plants Reporting & Prevention Project

Indiana Department of Natural Resources - Invasive Plant Species Fact Sheets

North American Weed Management Association - Mapping Standards. This site provides the mapping standards that many organizations use for collecting information on invasive species.

Invasive Plant Atlas of New England - Early Detection Program

Center for Aquatic and Invasive Plants - fact sheets, images, invasive plant management plans, invasive plant recognition cards, and identification videos.

USDA Manager's Tool Kit - Early Detection & Rapid Response

National Park Service EDRR Protocol - The Eastern Rivers and Mountains and Northeast Temperate Networks of the National Park Service Inventory and Monitoring Program published the "Early Detection of Invasive Species: Surveillance Monitoring and Rapid Response Protocol." This document along with the 2008/2009 summary report and all species identification cards are public and available online.

Strategies for Effective State Early Detection/Rapid Response Programs for Plant Pests and Pathogens, a report by attorney Read Porter of the Envirnomental Law Institute that assesses the utility of state early detection and rapid response (ED/RR) laws for identifying and stopping the spread of invasive plant pests and pathogens. 

The report describes components of a successful ED/RR regulatory structure, explains federal regulations that affect state action for each component, examines the strengths and weaknesses of specific laws in fourteen states that have responded to invasive pathogens, and examines the performance of ED/RR laws in practice via in-depth case studies from New York and Texas.  

This report was produced by the Environmental Law Institute with funding and guidance from The Nature Conservancy.  The report is available free of charge from ELI’s website, at www.elistore.org/reports_detail.asp?ID=11223

 

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New Invader Alerts:

Be On The Lookout For New Invasive Plants In Ramsey County (MN) Flyer

Developed by the Ramsey County CWMA in Minnesota, this flyer lists nine major species of concern. It contains great color photos and links to control and management websites.  They have also developed an excellent flyer about Oriental Bittersweet.

Sonchus palustris (Marsh sow-thistle)

Cardamine impatiens (Narrow-leaved bitter-cress) - an aggressive mustard that has been found in Indiana, Michigan, and Minnesota.

Perennial pepperweed (Lepidium latifolium L.) was recently discovered along a roadside in Green Bay, Wisconsin. This plant is very similar to Canada thistle as it can invade croplands and natural areas causing near monotypic stands. Perennial pepperweed has become a major problem in other states as it has invaded alfalfa fields, pastures, rights of ways, and natural areas causing significant economic and environmental damage.  It has been found in other Midwestern states, but this is the first siting in Wisconsin.

A factsheet that provides detailed information how to identify and manage this plant can be found at http://ipcm.wisc.edu/Portals/0/Blog/Files/20/322/Perennial-pepperweed.pdf

For additional information, please contact, Mark Renz, Extension Weed Scientist, Agronomy Department, University of Wisconsin Madison, at mrenz@wisc.edu, or 608 263-7437.

Hill mustard (Bunias orientalis L.), a new invasive mustard, is spreading throughout the southern part of Wisconsin. Major infestations have been reported in Green county near Monroe, with another patchy found in Lafayette county last year. Follow this link, http://ipcm.wisc.edu/Portals/0/Blog/Files/17/280/Hill%20Mustard%20Fact%20Sheet%20MR.pdf, to a factsheet that discusses this species and provides characteristics and pictures to help with identification. Key traits to help differentiate it from other mustards are its robust yellow flowers (should be flowering right now - early June) and “warty bumps” on the stems.

If you think you have an infestation of Hill mustard, please contact, Mark Renz, Extension Weed Scientist, Agronomy Department, University of Wisconsin Madison, at mrenz@wisc.edu, or 608 263-7437.

"Giant hogweed nipped in the bud; Two of the noxious plants discovered in Lake Forest." Click here for text of an article that appeared in the News-Sun, Lake County, Illinois. It highlights the importance of early detectionprograms and quotes Debbie Maurer, MIPN Vice-President and Chair of the Early Detection/Rapid Response Committee.

Kudzu Identification & Eradication Project, Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Entomology and Plant Pathology. If you are aware of any sites for kudzu in the state, please contact Ken Cote.

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Species Based Invasive Plant Ranking Projects

Early Detection and Rapid Response (EDRR) is one approach to limit the spread of invasive exotic species. In recent years, several EDRR projects have been proposed or implemented in the Midwest and adjacent Canadian Provinces, including a survey which allowed project leaders to submit important information about their projects. Click on a region to go to the links generated by this survey.

 

 

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Maintaining Data on Invasive Species

Maintaining data on invasive species can be a difficult and time consuming task. The types of data you collect depends on the types of questions you want to answer. Although there will always be some variability in the data you collect, you may find it useful to standardize the more general categories of data you will consistently collect. The North American Weed Management Association, www.nawma.org, has developed a data collection standard for invasive plant monitoring in the western United States and it has been adopted by several federal agencies, including US Forest Service and the National Park Service. Although the NAWMA Standard may not include all of the data fields you feel are necessary, it does standardize some of the most commonly collected data fields.

Click here to go to a list of data forms that are being used by different agencies for varying purposes. They are categorized by general purpose for your convenience. Please note that not all forms follow the NAWMA standard. If you find one of these forms meets your data collection needs, or may act as a template for you to begin your own data collection form, please feel free to download the form to your computer.

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Mapping Data on Invasive Species

The National Institute of Invasive Species Science is a consortium of government and non-government organizations formed to develop cooperative approaches for invasive species science that meet the urgent needs of land managers and the public. Field data on aquatic and terrestrial species and diseases can be collected in any form and uploaded. These datasets are integrated into the database and displayed as “living maps” of harmful invaders on the Web to serve land managers, landowners, researchers, government officials, and the public.

EDDMapS (Early Detection and Distribution Mapping System). The University of Georgia’s Bugwood Network has developed an Early Detection and Distribution Mapping System, or EDDMapS, to provide a more accurate picture of the distribution of invasive species across the United States. EDDMapS will allow land managers, agencies and others to set priorities for early detection and rapid response (EDRR), as well as formulate overall invasive plant management action plans.

 

For more information, contact MIPN via e-mail: Info at MIPN.org