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    Int J Antimicrob Agents. 2013 Mar;41(3):272-7. doi: 10.1016/j.ijantimicag.2012.10.023. Epub 2013 Jan 9.

    Current management of prosthetic joint infections in adults: results of an Emerging Infections Network survey.

    Source

    Division of Infectious Diseases, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 S. Euclid, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. Electronic address: jmarscha@dom.wustl.edu.

    Abstract

    There is a dearth of guidance on the management of prosthetic joint infections (PJIs), in particular because of the lack of high-quality evidence for optimal antibiotics. Thus, we designed a nine-question survey of current practices and preferences among members of the Emerging Infections Network, a CDC-sponsored network of infectious diseases physicians, which was distributed in May 2012. In total, 556 (47.2%) of 1178 network members responded. As first-line antibiotic choice for MSSA PJI, 59% of responders indicated oxacillin/nafcillin, 33% cefazolin and 7% ceftriaxone; the commonest alternative was cefazolin (46%). For MRSA PJI, 90% preferred vancomycin, 7% daptomycin and 0.8% ceftaroline; the commonest alternative was daptomycin (65%). Antibiotic selection for coagulase-negative staphylococci varied depending on methicillin susceptibility. For staphylococcal PJIs with retained hardware, most providers would add rifampicin. Propionibacterium is usually treated with vancomycin (40%), penicillin (23%) or ceftriaxone (17%). Most responders thought 10-19% of all PJIs were culture-negative. Culture-negative PJIs of the lower extremities are usually treated with a vancomycin/fluoroquinolone combination, and culture-negative shoulder PJIs with vancomycin/ceftriaxone. The most cited criteria for selecting antibiotics were ease of administration and the safety profile. A treatment duration of 6-8 weeks is preferred (by 77% of responders) and is mostly guided by clinical response and inflammatory markers. Ninety-nine percent of responders recommend oral antibiotic suppression (for varying durations) in patients with retained hardware. In conclusion, there is considerable variation in treatment of PJIs both with identified pathogens and those with negative cultures. Future studies should aim to identify optimum treatment strategies.

    Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

    PMID:
    23312602
    [PubMed - in process]
    PMCID:
    PMC3572796
    [Available on 2014/3/1]

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