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The Commission permanently loaned statues of suffragists Lucy Burns and Dora Lewis to the Lucy Burns Museum at the Workhouse Arts Center in Lorton, Virginia. Today, the Workhouse Arts Center is a dynamic, multi-use artistic space, but in 1917, it was the site of the Occoquan Workhouse, where dozens of suffragists were imprisoned for picketing the White House in support of women's right to vote.

Lucy Burns and Dora Lewis were members of the National Woman’s Party, the suffrage organization that orchestrated the pickets. They were two of the 33 suffrage prisoners who experienced the “Night of Terror” at Occoquan Workhouse, a night in November 1917 that became infamous for the force and brutality suffragists faced from prison guards. The statues honoring Burns' and Lewis' courage and fortitude were unveiled during the opening of the Lucy Burns Museum on January 23, 2020.


Suffragist Dora Lewis (middle) leaving the Occoquan Workhouse after a five day hunger strike, c. 1918   (Library of Congress)

Suffragist Dora Lewis (middle) leaving the Occoquan Workhouse after a five day hunger strike, c. 1918 (Library of Congress)

Dora Lewis Statue

Dora Lewis Statue

Lucy Burns Statue

Lucy Burns Statue

Suffragist Lucy Burns imprisoned at the Occoquan Workhouse, c. 1917   (Library of Congress)

Suffragist Lucy Burns imprisoned at the Occoquan Workhouse, c. 1917 (Library of Congress)